Last edited by Gugal
Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

6 edition of Preventive Health Measures for Lesbian and Bisexual Women found in the catalog.

Preventive Health Measures for Lesbian and Bisexual Women

  • 295 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by Haworth Medical Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Health & Fitness,
  • Consumer Health,
  • Health/Fitness,
  • Healthy Living,
  • Sexuality,
  • Women"s Health - General,
  • Bisexual women,
  • Diseases,
  • Health and hygiene,
  • Lesbians,
  • Prevention

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsShelly Kerr (Editor), Robin Mathy (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages143
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9358850M
    ISBN 10078903333X
    ISBN 109780789033338

    Koh, A.S. () Use of preventive health behaviors by lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual women: questionnaire survey. Western Journal of Medicine – PubMed CrossRef Google Scholar.   Indeed, we know there are more mostly straight women and men than bisexual and lesbian/gay individuals combined (see my earlier posts). The .

      Introduction. The unique healthcare experiences of lesbian and bisexual (LB) women are overshadowed by research focused primarily on heterosexual females and homosexual males. 1 However, existing LB research focuses predominantly on white, middle-class women and indicates that they face significant health disparities as revealed in a Institute of Medicine report. 2 The report .   Koh AS. Use of preventive health behaviours by lesbians, bisexual and heterosexual women: questionnaire survey. West J Med ; Aaron DJ, Markovic N, Danielson ME, et al. Behavioral risk factors for disease and preventive health practices among lesbians. Am J Public Health ; Fethers K, Marks C, Mindel A.

    Surround yourself with support, especially if you’re lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer (LGBTQ). The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that people who are LGBTQ are more likely to use alcohol or drugs, have substance abuse issues and drink heavily into later life. For some, substance use can be an attempt to quell difficult. Get this from a library! Lesbian and Bisexual Women's Mental Health.. [Robin M Mathy; Shelly K Kerr] -- Examine the psychosocial factors that affect lesbian and bisexual women's mental healthThis essential guide presents up-to-date, evidence-based information that can be .


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Preventive Health Measures for Lesbian and Bisexual Women Download PDF EPUB FB2

Research topics in Preventive Health Measures for Lesbian and Bisexual Women include: the effects of lesbian or bisexual identity on preventative health behaviors cancer prevention and screening behaviors using American Cancer Society guidelines as 5/5(1).

Preventive health behaviors among lesbian and bisexually identified women / Brooke E. Wells [and others] --Cancer prevention and screening behaviors in lesbians / Cecelia Gatson Grindel [and others] --Sexual minority women's interactions with breast cancer providers / Ulrike Boehmer, Patricia Case --Community support, community values: the.

Objectives To determine whether lesbians and bisexual women are less likely than heterosexual women to use preventive health Written, anonymous, self-administered g 33 physicians' offices and community clinics mainly in urban areas of 13 ipants lesbians, bisexual women, and heterosexual by: Some books break myths.

Others break silences. A few break new ground. The Health of Sexual Minorities achieves all three aims. The first book of its kind, this resource offers a multidimensional picture of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) health across clinical and social disciplines to give readers a full and nuanced understanding of these diverse populations/5(4).

Purpose. Adult lesbian and bisexual (LB) women are more likely to be obese than adult heterosexual women.

To address weight- and fitness-related health disparities among older LB women using culturally appropriate interventions, the Office on Women's Health (OWH) provided funding for the program, Healthy Weight in Lesbian and Bisexual Women (HWLB): Striving for a Healthy by: 8. Obesity. Lesbian and bisexual women suffer from higher rates of obesity than heterosexual women.

Obesity is linked to other conditions, like heart disease and cancer, which are among the leading causes of death for women. Regular activity and a healthy diet can lower a person’s chances of obesity, but women should always talk with their health care providers before jumping into an exercise.

Lesbian and bisexual women’s health is a concern for many women worldwide, but the infor- prevention campaigns, training semi-nars, studies, publications, articles, leaflets, postcards from countries all over the world, some measures to promote and protect the realization of the right to health, with a view to supporting.

Lesbian and bisexual women are part of a diverse community with various health concerns. While all women have specific health risks, lesbian and bisexual women are at a higher risk for certain diseases than other women. Find information and resources from CDC and other government agencies and community partners that address lesbian and bisexual.

However, sexual minority women, such as those who identify as lesbian or bisexual as well as women who have sex with women, have some specific health concerns.

Although your individual risks are shaped by many factors beyond your sexual orientation and practices — including family history and age — it's important to understand common health.

Studies have found that lesbians and bisexual women have higher rates of breast cancer than heterosexual women.

They also get less routine health care than other women, including colorectal, breast, and cervical cancer screening. Gay and bisexual men also face a number of barriers to getting the routine health care and cancer screening tests.

Lesbian and bisexual women have specific sexual health needs, including the need for information about transmission and prevention of sexually transmissible infections (STIs) between women, contraceptive and conception advice, and support regarding any abuse experiences.

These needs can be easily accommodated in general practice. Main Outcome Measures. Health outcomes included subjective health status, general practitioner or gynecologist visit in the last 6 months, and satisfaction from the Israeli healthcare system.

Results. In(%) lesbians, (%) bisexual women. Introduction. It is estimated that about 3–6% of women in the United States identify themselves as lesbians or bisexuals (LBs) 1, a national representative sample performed in Israel, % of all women responded that they had at least a single lifetime same-sex partner and % self-identified themselves as LB (Mor Z, unpublished data, ).

Lesbians can get the same sexually transmitted infections (STIs) as straight women. Lesbian partners can transmit STIs by skin-to-skin contact, mucous membrane contact, vaginal fluids, and menstrual blood. Ask your health care provider about whether you need STI screening, and how often.

Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website.

Lesbian and bisexual women may have or perceive barriers to getting preventive health care, and may be at greater risk for certain conditions such as obesity and breast cancer, and have higher rates of smoking, alcohol use, and substance use than heterosexual women. Lesbian and Bisexual Women – CDC LGBT Health pages; Cancer Facts for Lesbians and Bisexual Women – The American.

among lesbian and bisexual women. More research is needed, especially looking at bisexual women’s risks compared to lesbians’ risks.

There are a number of health issues that lesbians and bisexual women should talk about with a doctor or nurse. Common health concerns for lesbian and bisexual women include: Heart disease.

Heart disease is the #1. GoalImprove the health, safety, and well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) ewLGBT individuals encompass all races and ethnicities, religions, and social classes.

Sexual orientation and gender identity questions are not asked on most national or State surveys, making it difficult to estimate the number of LGBT individuals and their health. Lesbian, bisexual, and transgender women face health disparities linked to social discrimination and denial of their civil and human rights.

These disparities 1 include the following: Lesbians are less likely to get preventive services for cancer. Lesbians and bisexual females are more likely to be overweight or obese.

In Healthy Peoplelesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people are for the first time identified in U.S. national health priorities as an at-risk population (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, ).Most of the early research on disparities by sexual orientation focused on mental health, indicating elevated prevalence of mental health problems among lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in a publication that percent of women and percent of men said they were “homosexual, gay, or lesbian,” and that percent of women and 2 percent of men said they were bisexual. These finding indicate that bisexual people may comprise the largest single group in the LGB.Research suggests that lesbian and bisexual women are at increased risk for adverse health outcomes, including overweight and obesity, poor mental health, substance abuse, violence, and barriers to optimal health care resulting from social and economic inequities.

1,2 Although frequently referred to as part of a larger group of sexual minorities, including gay men and transgender individuals.IMPROVING THE HEALTH CARE OF LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER (LGBT) PEOPLE: Understanding and Eliminating Health Disparities Kevin L Ard MD, MPH1, and Harvey J Makadon2 MD The National LGBT Health Education Center, The Fenway Institute1,2; Brigham and Women’s Hospital1; and Harvard Medical School1,2, Boston, MA.

INTRODUCTION.